Film socialisme

  • 101'
  • France
  • 2010
Film socialisme, the farewell of the old French master Jean Luc Godard, is an overwhelming iconoclasm about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, geometry and the shelf-life of Europe; about the Second World War and Hollywood; Islam and ancient Egypt; Franco, bullfighting and football.
The setting is a cruise ship - society in a nutshell - where nobody speaks the same language. The subtitles are by Godard himself, using the English spoken by Indians in old westerns: ‘AIDS good for killing blacks’. And: 'light because darkness'. Finally, we see the words NO COMMENT appear on the screen.
At the last Cannes Festival, no film divided audiences as much as this one, on which Godard worked for four years with a budget of ‘only’ 600,000 euros. Some people found it humourless and unpoetic; at least as many others regarded it as a profound essay about how morally low Europe has fallen.

Director
Jean-Luc Godard
Countries of production
France, Switzerland
Year
2010
Festival Edition
IFFR 2011
Length
101'
Medium
DCP
Language
French
Producer
Ruth Waldburger
Production Company
Vega Film
Sales
Wild Bunch
Screenplay
Jean-Luc Godard
Cinematography
Paul Grivas, Fabrice Aragno
Sound Design
Gabriel Hafner, François Musy
Cast
Catherine Tanvier, Christian Sinniger
Website
https://wildbunch.biz/movie/film-socialism