The Raven

  • 86'
  • USA
  • 1963
Roger Corman, king of the low-budget exploitation film, took advantage of blossoming teenage culture in the 1950s. Corman was responsible for countless box-office successes with American International Pictures (AIP) throughout the 1950s and 1960s, tailored specifically for teenagers - a whole new audience that AIP identified at least 15 years before the major studios. Indeed, parents were quick to snuggle down in front of the new medium of television while the teenagers crept out of the house to have exciting adventures with the other sex. The drive-in cinema offered boys and girls an excuse to go somewhere together. Corman filmed several stories by Edgar Allan Poe, in which he focused on the dreamy and supernatural mood. With his psychedelic opening titles, he seamlessly connected to the world of the youth of his time.
In the horror comedy The Raven (1963), Corman introduced humour into his series of Poe adaptations and he gave the very young Jack Nicholson a supporting role in which he was already able to exploit his famous grin to the utmost. Can be seen in a special drive-in cinema.

Director
Roger Corman
Country of production
USA
Production Year
1963
Festival Edition
IFFR 2010
Length
86'
Medium
35mm
Language
English
Sales
Hollywood Classics / Altadena Films
Screenplay
Richard Matheson, based upon the poem by Edgar Allan Poe
Cinematography
Floyd Crosby
Editor
Ronald Sinclair
Production Design
Daniel Haller
Sound Design
John Bury Jr.
Music
Les Baxter
Cast
Peter Lorre, Jack Nicholson