With his 12-year-old daughter in mind, Scorsese translates Brian Selznick’s children’s book into an initiation into the art of cinema. He does this both in a literal and a metaphorical sense: with an evocation of the both glorious and tragic career of Georges Méliès as well as a playful conceptualisation of filmic parameters such as the notion of time, mechanised movement and the illusion of depth.
Leafing through an old note-pad leads to the discovery of a flip book, and a panoramic view over Paris suddenly becomes one big festival of light. While conceiving a homage to analogue film, Scorsese manifests himself a master of digital cinema.
And yet the actors always remain his central concern. The film also contains some hints of a larger historical perspective. One of the most stunning and memorable archival documents is the tinted footage of traumatised soldiers returning from the front in the First World War.

Filmmaker
Martin Scorsese
Country
USA
Year
2011
Medium
DCP
Length
126’
Language
English
Producer
Graham King, Martin Scorsese
Production Company
GK Films, Paramount Pictures
Sales
Paramount Pictures
Writer
John Logan, based on the book The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Cinematography
Robert Richardson
Editor
Thelma Schoonmaker
Production Design
Dante Ferretti
Sound Design
John Midgley
Music
Howard Shore
Cast
Asa Butterfield, Ben Kingsley
Website
http://gk-films.com/films/hugo