The Last Dining Table

  • 91'
  • South Korea
  • 2006
Roh Gyeong-Tae (Teddy) has made one of the most charming and moving films of 2006, a film that has fortunately managed to win more and more film lovers. With its spectacularly beautiful soundtrack and an idiosyncratic style - minimalist and surrealist, yet in all its poetic beauty not inaccessible - The Last Dining Table is concerned about the fate of people who have been marginalised by modern society. A society that is incomprehensible in the eyes of the characters who, coming from the underclass, are excluded from the benefits of progress, and in the words of the director a society that is characterised by ‘irony and contradictions, the disappearance of family values and global pollution’.
We follow several narrative lines that only link up at the end. In the slum areas of Seoul lives a ‘father’ addicted to gambling, a recidivist looking for his parents who once deserted him. A ‘son’, a gigolo, has AIDS. In the countryside just outside the metropolis, lives a ‘grandmother ’, who wants to divorce her dead husband, a ‘mother’ who works in a mortuary and an unemployed ‘teenager’ who is dissatisfied with her appearance. (GT)

Director
Roh Gyeong-Tae
Country of production
South Korea
Production Year
2006
Festival Edition
IFFR 2007
Length
91'
Medium
35mm
Original title
Majimak babsang
Language
Korean
Producer
Park Kang-Mi
Production Company
Cicada I Remember
Sales
Cicada I Remember
Screenplay
Roh Gyeong-Tae
Cinematography
Jung Young-sam
Editor
Kim Mi-Joo
Production Design
Kim Jae-Chung
Music
Lee Jaesin
Cast
Baek Hyun-Joo, Kim Do-Yeon
Website
http://memmem.com