Camel(s)

  • 92'
  • South Korea
  • 2001
Camels. 'Even in the desert, where the air is dry and the sun burns, where the night is extremely cold, where there is always a sandstorm blowing and where no plant will grow, even there they survive. And apparently their eyes are always moist.'A man and a women meet each other. They both have a family, but feel the necessity to leave together. They drive to a hotel by the sea. Only on the way does the man ask the woman her name. They turn out to have a lot in common, both their fathers were schoolteachers, they both grew up on the coast and neither of themmanaged to study medicine. But these similarities are not the cause of their joint flight. The real reason is that they are exhausted.Five years after the more cheerful Motel Cactus, Camel(s) is also set in a hotel. Not a hotel room where panting can be heard through the thin walls, but where suppressed human emotions escape with a sigh. The film is shot on DV in black and white, which was then transferred to 35mm film material, providing a grainy, documentary effect. The DV camera was however not used hand-held: the camera is still and static. Camel(s) is an honest and moving film, with fantastic acting which provides a profound insight into the emotions of forty-somethings.
Director
Park Ki-Yong
Premiere
International premiere
Country of production
South Korea
Production Year
2001
Festival Edition
IFFR 2002
Length
92'
Medium
35mm
Original title
Nakta(deul)
Language
Korean
Producers
Fine Communications Inc., Ko Chung-Gil
Sales
E Pictures
Screenplay
Park Ki-Yong
Editor
Kim Sung-Soo, Park Ki-Yong