Tips

Next Film Patrons ambassadors’ IFFR tips

What are festival insiders, tastemakers and creatives most looking forward to at this edition of IFFR? We asked actress Gaite Jansen, musician Roufaida Aboutaleb and filmmaker Nina Gantz, all three ambassadors for Next Film Patrons, IFFR’s circle of young professionals and film-lovers. 

Gaite Jansen

Actress Gaite Jansen broke through outside of the Netherlands in the series Peaky Blinders and Jett. But her acting career started right here in Rotterdam. What is she most looking forward to at this year’s festival?

Paradise Drifters by Mees Peijnenburg
Raw road movie about three teens who only have each other. Heart-rending, intense acting from the young cast.

Why?
“This is the fiction feature debut of filmmaker Mees Peijnenburg (who happens to be my partner). I’ve seen the film and I think it’s more than marvellous, so I can’t wait for it to be seen by a bigger audience.”

Atlantique by Mati Diop
In Dakar, two young lovers have a star-crossed relationship. Fate may bring them together in this beautiful, darkly romantic tale.

Why?
“Apparently, this is a really exceptional film. An urgent story in a contemporary style, made by a young director. I have the feeling that this is a film that will really get under your skin. I have the same feeling about Les Misérables, Ladj Ly’s debut about the banlieue in Paris where he grew up.”

Roufaida Aboutaleb

Roufaida Aboutaleb is a familiar face in cultural Rotterdam. As well as a musician, she works as a freelance music programmer and producer. She has seen at least twenty films at the festival every year since she was fifteen. Her tips for IFFR 2020:

IFFR x VPRO: De kijk van Koolhoven
During this live episode of the VPRO film programme De kijk van Koolhoven, director Martin Koolhoven shares his love of Italian genre films.

Why?
"I really like to be introduced to a genre I know nothing at all about. So it’s ideal to be able to decide on the basis of Koolhoven’s introduction what I want to watch for the rest of the festival.”

The Life of Fathers by Rien Bexkens
In his personal search for fatherhood, Marwan Magroun takes viewers from Tunisia to the streets of Rotterdam.

Why?
“Marwan is an exceptional Rotterdam image-maker. He came up with the concept for this film and then realised it, together with Rotterdam-based production house Koala Koncepts. I think it’s very important that voices such as Marwan’s are heard in Dutch film. So it’s great that his film has its premiere at IFFR. He represents the diverse sound of Rotterdam-West.”

Adam by Maryam Touzani
In a small Moroccan bakery, widow Abla gradually opens her heart to Samia, an young unmarried pregnant woman she takes into her home.

Why?
“I’m very curious about this. I have no idea what kind of film it is, or what to expect. But I’m looking forward to being surprised by the view of a female Moroccan filmmaker. My roots are there, but I don’t know the country very well. I can’t wait to find out what this film will tell me about my fatherland.”

  • Van links: Nina Gantz, Gaite Jansen (©Janey van Ierland), Roufaida Aboutaleb

Nina Gantz

Filmmaker Nina Gantz, who grew up in Rotterdam, won a BAFTA for her short stop-motion film Edmond, and has been based in England since graduating from the National Film and Television School. But this doesn’t stop her from picking out some IFFR titles for us:

Talk: Frameworks – Quay Brothers
In this unique, immersive installation, the Quay Brothers introduce a number of motifs, images and objects from their future film-in-the-making.

Why?
“I first saw the work of these English animation directors as part of the feature film Frida, about Frida Kahlo, where they animated her dream sequences. It showed me a strange and dark side of animation that you don't often see. The worlds the Quay Brothers create are unique and full of detail. It would be great to get a peek into their heads and get to know how they work.”

Baba by Sarah Blok and Lisa Konno
Captivating portrait of one of the first Turkish immigrants in the cultural sector, interviewed by his daughter amid a fashion collection.

Why?
“I'm very curious to see this film as it looks like the filmmakers have shown Baba's story in an exceptional way. A surrealistic mix between documentary and fashion.”

 

Photo in header: Gaite Jansen © Joke Schut