Roger and Me

Michael Moore

In the mid-eighties, General Motors decided to shut down its plants in the city of Flint, leaving thousands of people unemployed. Son of a GM worker, Michael Moore was eager to investigate the case. A brilliant satire on capitalism and a great example of activist filmmaking.

In 1989, Roger Smith was chairman of General Motors and Michael Moore was making his first documentary. Moore used his camera to pursue the man responsible for relocating 30,000 jobs to the cheap labour country of Mexico, leading to the complete ruin of Moore’s hometown, Flint.
While Smith takes to his heels every time Moore comes near, the filmmaker documents the devastating consequences of capitalism with equal doses of satire and bile. Humour turns out to be a highly effective weapon in the struggle against social injustice. Activist Moore doesn’t shy away from the use of clever editing and a loose interpretation of chronology to emphasise his case, wittily harvesting outrage from corporate and right-wing America.
Twenty-five years later, the film stock was in need of cleaning up (IFFR is showing the restored version), but the content and message are as appalling and relevant as ever.

More information

Filmmaker
Michael Moore
Country
USA
Year
1989
Medium
DCP
Length
91
Language
English
Producer
Michael Moore
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures
Sales
Warner Bros. Pictures
Writer
Michael Moore
Cinematography
Kevin Rafferty, Chris Beaver, John Prusak, Bruce Schermer
Editor
Jennifer Beman, Wendey Stanzler
Sound Design
Jennifer Beman
Music
David Hess, Ethel Lee
Website
https://michaelmoore.com