Kitano Takeshi

Kitano Takeshi

KITANO Takeshi (1947, Japan) is a public figure in Japan: television personality, novelist, writer of short stories and poetry, cartoonist, painter, scriptwriter, actor and filmmaker. Kitano entered show business in 1972 as 'Beat' Takeshi, a nom de plume he still uses today. In 1989 he made his debut as a director. Since then he has been involved in a film almost every year, whether as a writer, editor, actor or director. His films have been nominated for the Golden Palm and Golden Lion numerous times.

Filmography

Sono otoko, kyobo ni tsuki/Violent Cop (1989), 3-4 x jugatsu/Boiling Point (1990), Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi/A Scene at the Sea (1991), Sonachine/Sonatine (1993), Minnâ-yatteruka/Getting Any? (1995), Kidzu ritan/Kids Return (1996), Hana-bi (Fireworks) (1997), Kikujiro no natsu/Kikujiro (1999), Brother (2000), Dooruzu/Dolls (2002), Zatôichi/Zatoichi (2003), Takeshis' (2005), Chacun son cinéma ou Ce petit coup au coeur quand la lumière s'éteint et que le film commence/To Each His Cinema (segment One Fine Day) (short, 2007), Kantoku - Banzai!/Glory to the Filmmaker! (2007), Akires to kame/Achilles and the Tortoise (2008), Autoreiji/Outrage (2010), Autoreiji: Biyondo/Beyond Outrage (2012), Ryûzô to 7 nin no kobun tachi/Ryuzo and the Seven Henchmen (2015), NEWS (2015, short), ASA (2015, short), Outrage Coda (2017)  

More info: Wikipedia, Kitano Takeshi

Kitano Takeshi at IFFR

3-4 Jugatsu - Boiling point

3-4 Jugatsu - Boiling point

The second hard action film by and with Takeshi, this time in a smaller role than in Violent Cop, but one which makes quite an impact. After this film Takeshi was to decide to disappear completely behind the camera.The film focuses on the service-station attendant Masaki, who plays in the baseball team The Eagles in his spare time. Masaki is by no means a great sportsman and his teammates make it clear that they would be better off without him. Back at his service station, he is forced by a gangster to wash his car. Masaki doesn't do so well enough for the gangster, who then proceeds to beat him up. He really is down on his luck.The snack-bar owner played by Takeshi is more or less the sponsor of the baseball team. He himself is a former gangster who decides to help the unfortunate Masaki. Suddenly the baseball players discover that their sponsor has disappeared and they go to see the gangsters with Masaki to find out what has happened. Two Eagles are almost beaten to death and Masaki only just manages to escape. He takes a tanker from the service station and drives it straight to the gangsters' hide-out.

Kitano Takeshi
  • 95'

  • Japan

IFFR 1992

Sono otoko kyobo ni tsuki - Violent cop

Sono otoko kyobo ni tsuki - Violent cop

@ In his debut film as director, the actor Kitano Takeshi himself plays the leading role of a violent cop. Sono Otoko Kyobo Ni Tsuki (Violent Cop, also known as Warning, this Man is Wild) is a genre film, a police film, which can be compared with Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry movies. This may not say very much, but Kitano Takeshi says even less. He is a charismatic actor who only carries the film with his glances and his walk.The film-maker plays detective Wagatsuma Ryosuke, who has an inimitable style of his own. When he sees a gang of young criminals beat up a tramp, he doesn't intervene, but follows the ringleader to his parents' home. Ryosuke forces his way in and beats the boy up in his own room. His superiors cannot approve of his methods and he receives one warning after another, which he accept in silence and apparent resignation. Wagatsuma would appear to be driven by a hatred of crime and is not concerned about his career. The motive for the hatred becomes clearer after his daughter is introduced into the story. She is mentally subnormal and a drug addict. She is the victim of unscrupulous dealers and the film leads almost systematically to the final showdown with the leader of the drugs gang.In Japan, Kitano Takeshi is best known as an actor, but he would appear to have a higher regard for directing: 'When I look through the viewfinder of the camera, I see what adifference it makes whether you are on or off the set. Of course the real work happens on the set.'

Kitano Takeshi
  • 103'

  • Japan

IFFR 1992