Dennis Hopper

Dennis Hopper

Still: The Last Movie
Dennis HOPPER (1936-2010, USA) was an actor and filmmaker. He studied acting at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego and the Actors Studio in New York. His first two film roles were in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) and Giant (1956). After struggling for acting work for several years, his career was revived with the help of John Wayne, who hired him to act in The Sons of Katie Elder (1965). He made his directorial debut with Easy Rider (1969), which he wrote together with Peter Fonda and Terry Southern. The film was nominated for the Palme d’Or and named Best First Work at Cannes, and became an important work in the New Hollywood movement. He directed and co-wrote The Last Movie in 1971, which went through a long and troubled post-production process, and he didn’t direct again until Out of the Blue (1980). The film premiered at Cannes and received a Palme d’Or nomination. In 1991, he was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award at Stockholm Film Festival and in 2003, he received a Donostia Lifetime Achievement Award in San Sebastián. He directed his final feature film Chasers in 1994, and his final film, the short Pashmy Dream, in 2008. He was given a star on the Walk of Fame in 2010, just two months before his death.

Filmography

Easy Rider (1969), The Last Movie (1971), Out of the Blue (1980), Colors (1988), Catchfire (1990), The Hot Spot (1990), Chasers (1994), Homeless (2000, short), Pashmy Dream (2008, short)

More info: Wikipedia, Dennis Hopper

Dennis Hopper at IFFR

Hearts of Darkness - A Filmmaker's Apocalypse

Hearts of Darkness - A Filmmaker's Apocalypse

In 1976 Francis Ford Coppola embarked on the filming of what was to be his most expensive and difficult undertaking. In Apocalypse Now he integrated themes from Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness into a story about the Vietnam War. The film was shot on the Philippines. Between March 1976 and August 1979, Coppola's wife Eleanor shot 60 hours of documentary material on the spot. Bahr and Hickenlooper, `Apocalypse fans', decided to transform this material, along with their own recordings which mainly consist of interviews and reminiscences, into the documentary Hearts of Darkness. A Film-maker's Apocalypse.The film tells the story of failures, obstacles and, not least, Coppola's obsession. It was as if a curse was on Apocalypse Now. Between screenplay and the final version on the silver screen were ten years, 238 days of shooting and 27 months post-production. Protagonist Harvey Keitel was sacked and replaced by Martin Sheen, who had a heart attack half-way through shooting. The helicopters borrowed from President Marcos were requisitioned to fight communist guerillas. Marlon Brando cost a million dollars a week but didn't even bother to read Conrad's book. It is in this light that one should see Coppola's statement that the film director is one of the last dictators is in this democratic world. Despite all the set-backs, Coppola himself was willing to do anything at any price. The film starts with the words which he spoke during the press conference in Cannes: `My film is not a movie about Vietnam. It is Vietnam. It is what it was really like. It was crazy.' Coppola's fear at the time (`This is a 20 million flop') was not to be: so far Apocalypse Now has earned more than 350 million dollars.

Fax Bahr, George Hickenlooper
  • 97'

  • USA

IFFR 1992