Tips

Tiger Teaser #4: Curtain Call

Every week, on Tiger Teaser Thursday, we give you a sneak preview of the upcoming festival programme. After art, award winning festival hits and live cinema we’re announcing a thematic programme in which artists and filmmakers reflect upon a pressing overarching theme.

Every year, IFFR presents a theme programme inviting artists to exhibit films, video installations and other work revolving around a shared question. This year’s programme, entitled Curtain Call, will investigate the consequences of ever-advancing technology and our human obsession with progress.

IFFR Programmer Edwin Carels: “Stephen Hawking claims we should make haste to prepare for inevitably leaving this planet. What does this say about us humans? Curtain Call wants to incite artistic reflection on mankind’s relentless ambition and the way it shapes the future, if any.”

Curtain Call wants to incite artistic reflection on mankind’s relentless ambition and the way it shapes the future, if any.” – Programmer Edwin Carels

Among the confirmed artworks are virtual reality installation Orbital Vanitas by Shaun Gladwell and VR-collective BADFAITH, a spin-off installation of the final scene of documentary Homo Sapiens by Nikolaus Geyrhalter, Fallen Astronaut by Paul van Hoeydonck and Shelter #6 by Sarah van Sonsbeeck.

  • Still: Orbital Vanitas, Shaun Gladwell for BADFAITH (2017)

  • Still: Homo Sapiens, Nikolaus Geyrhalter (2018)

  • Still: Fallen Astronaut, Paul van Hoeydonck (1971) - collection M HKA / collection Vlaamse Gemeenschap

  • Still: Shelter #6, Sarah van Sonsbeeck (2016) - on loan from Henk Drosterij and Karen Knispel

Curtain Call’s cinematic programme consists of four feature films and four compilations, conspicuously entitled Dreaming Androids, Fata Morgana, Reverse Engineering and Colonizing Chaos. We’ll soon announce the film titles constituting Curtain Call.

Check out all Tiger Teasers so far.
Check out all confirmed films and events of IFFR until now.

Photo in header: Credits: Fallen Astronaut (1971), Paul van Hoeydonck