According to Alasdair Fraser, music is the language of the soul. That is why, in his opinion, it is so important that people find their own voice by making music. For years and in various countries, the Scottish former industrial engineer has organised popular fiddle camps for violin and cello players, dancers and vocalists of all levels and ages, from children to the aged. He makes sure that musicians regain their self-confidence, which they frequently lose in the conventional music world with its focus on achievement. Dancing is important because a strong rhythm – the addictive groove – is an important element often forgotten in classical music.

The film shows how the veiled ideologist Fraser inspires, motivates and carries away the participants in his ‘Utopian dream’. For him, traditional Scottish music has an unmistakably political message: it’s an essential part of a culture that has been suppressed for so long. 

Part of Scopitone Cafe, an eclectic mix of documentaries about music and how it is experienced. Stick around for a Q&A and live music by folk band Los Banda. The bar is open! Free admission.

Filmmaker
Tommie Dell Smith
Country
USA
Year
2017
Medium
File
Length
62’
Language
English
Producer
Tommie Dell Smith
Production Company
Verité Productions
Sales
Verité Productions
Cinematography
Bob Elfstrom, Michael Anderson, Michael Lutman
Editor
Elizabeth Finlayson
Sound Design
Dan Gleich
Music
Alasdair Fraser
Website
http://thegroovemovie.com