Uzbekistan in the 1920s: Bolshevik commander Maksumov returns to the Uchkurgan settlement after spending a few days in the regional capital. He finds the place devastated and depopulated. His opponent, Hayrullah, a leader of the anti-Soviet bandits known as basmachi, has not only defeated the Red Army troops but also convinced more than a hundred of them to switch sides. Maksumov decides to go to the lion’s den on his own in order to confront the enemy.
Among the film’s strengths is a credible evocation of impending doom during the opening episodes, created by Aleksandr Pann’s camera - with wide, dust-filled vistas of devastation and hopelessness. The film, as with many other Red Westerns, uses the exotic nature of Central Asia to impressive visual effect. The chase and fight scenes are staged in a professional manner. Interestingly, both the habits and rituals of the native population are depicted with similar degrees of authenticity and respect.

Original title
Sedmaya pulya
Filmmaker
Ali Khamraev
Country
USSR
Year
1972
Medium
35mm
Length
84’
Language
Russian
Production Company
Uzbekfilm
Sales
Gosfilmofond
Writer
Andrei Konchalovsky, Fridrik Gorenstein
Cinematography
Aleksandr Pann
Editor
V. Makarova
Production Design
Emonuel Kalantarov
Music
Rumil Vildanov
Cast
Suimenkul Chokmorov