Not for the first time in a Korean film, Park Chul-Hee’s feature debut focuses on a doomed hitman. This time, a very unusual one: the nameless hero (he is referred to as ‘Killa’) doesn’t talk, but is saving for an expensive operation that should heal his shortened tongue and speech impediment. So the aim of his virtuoso knife work is not inhuman. In addition, he is only involved with clearing up ill-mannered scum, and there is plenty of that. And last but not least the hero, played by the wonderful Shin Ha-Kyun (of Save the Green Planet! fame), is crazy about shellfish and dreams of being a bullfighter in America… But his companion Ballet, specialised in deadly kungfu, wants to use his savings to start a dance school.
Of course it is not exactly legal, all this well-choreographed killing of hypocritical politicians, bent priests and men who abuse women, but fortunately the film has its charming spun-out light dry-comic and intimate homey sides which are just as impressive as the visual bravura that accompanies good old ultraviolence. Our hero gets hitched to the barmaid She and starts to look after an orphaned boy. Could it be that happiness is in store for this small thrown-together family? (GT)

Original title
Ye-ui-up-nun-gut-deul
Filmmaker
Park Chul-Hee
Premiere
European première
Country
South Korea
Year
2006
Medium
35mm
Length
113’
Language
Korean
Producer
Hwang Woo-hyun
Production Company
Tube Pictures
Sales
The Core Studio
Writer
Park Chul-Hee
Cinematography
Oh Seung-Hwan
Editor
Steve M. Choe
Production Design
Lee Jung-woo, Kim Kwang-Soo
Sound Design
Oh Sung-Jin
Music
Jeon Sang-Yoon
Cast
Shin Ha-Kyun, Yoon Ji-Hye