Cinema Regained

Programme 2004

In 'Cinema Regained'

Frau Böhm

Frau Böhm

`Die Böhm', a photographic cooperation between the artist friends Katja Stuke and Oliver Sieber, is a project that has appeared since September 1999 in the form of a magazine. It is published about four times a year in Düsseldorf, each time with a different umbrella subject. The photographic project reflects the differences, but also the similarities between the visual interest of both artists. They work independently of each other: the photos by one form a commentary, addition or new framework of interpretation for the photos of the other. For the episode 'Frau Böhm: Unser Film', original locations of legendary Hollywood films have been sought out and photographed in their present state. Looking for the fictional in the real, in some cases the spectacular elements of reality can barely be found; other locations are not even accessible anymore. The viewer's expectations and associations automatically evoked by these places are charmingly provided with a question mark.

Katja Stuke, Oliver Sieber
  • Germany

IFFR 2004

I Began to Wish .....

I Began to Wish .....

Julie Murray: `The sea sucks the seed back into the ocean, the flowers fold like umbrellas, shoots recoil into hiding, in seeds that shrink. The plants accelerate their tremble and wobble and glass unbreaks all around them. Strawberries blanch and tomatoes grow pale. The father, leering, holds forth a flower and suddenly his smile fades to awful seriousness. In an odd concentrated ritual the father and son carefully tip over all the flower pots, laying the plants to rest and it is in this end, around the time he figures the flowers are talking to him, that the son wishes his father had killed him.'

Julie Murray
  • 5'

  • USA

IFFR 2004

European premiere

Living

Living

Man, woman and camera live in mutual tension with each other and the empty space. Zwartjes' masterpiece.tekst IFFR 1992:Living is a demonstration of the virtuoso camera-work in the films of Zwartjes from this period. He plays the lead in the film, but at the same time operates the (hand-held) camera which he points at himself. Zwartjes' technique of hand-held filming (without looking through the viewfinder which he couldn't anyway in this case) in rapid yet flowing movements reaches its perfection here. Zwartjes: 'I was as strong as an ox in those days.' The film is part of the series Home Sweet Home, exploring the various rooms in a house (Zwartjes' own house, new at the time, in The Hague). Zwartjes' wife Trix also plays a role in Living.The film was shot with an extremely wide-angle lens which distorted the surroundings and the people. The latter move restlessly through the house; the mood is that of a nightmare. The journey through the house to the top ends in the light.

Frans Zwartjes
  • 15'

  • Netherlands

IFFR 2004

My Personal Hitchcock

My Personal Hitchcock

Storyboards summarise a complete film in just a few images. A sequence of apparently loose images is transformed with the fantasy and ideas of the viewer into action. In her work `My Personal Hitchcock', Katja Stuke combines still images from several films by Alfred Hitchcock into a new, personal storyboard. By taking film images out of their original context, she manages to create a new space of interpretation, even though we know where the images come from. In this way, she creates an opportunity for the viewer to construct complex, individual stories, in which we can project our own thoughts and ideas.

Katja Stuke
  • Germany

IFFR 2004

They Say

They Say

Michele Smith: `They Say consists of two reels of heavily edited (frame by frame) and overlaid 16mm film. It was then intercut with the grainy and scratchy Greek melodrama rental films on VHS. I used fewer 16mm found footage source reels and focused on a few reels as the bulk of material to play with narrative structure in a way related to but different than in my first work. I used quite a bit of footage from one narrative short film about a boy and a wild horse. When nearing the end I was getting tired of editing it and decided to put it out in my garden and dumped a few litter boxes on top of it. Contents -wood pellets and bunny poop. I forgot how long I left it out -it rained a few times. Perhaps a week. I then washed it with laundry detergent and hot water. I want my films to be open. The viewer creates the version of the film they will see by the way in which they view it. This is on a narrative/symbolic/metaphorical level as well as on a visual and structural level. The rapid intercutting and weaving of strands of different footage and elements creates a time space where one must mix what they are seeing for themselves. There is no one way to perceive the links of still images into an illusion of movement. One can, with a readjusting of their viewing, change their experience of the work throughout.'

Michele Smith
  • 48'

  • USA

IFFR 2004

Tourniquette

Tourniquette

Static landscape film with one recurring action.tekst IFFR 1992:Tourniquet is an extraordinary landscape painting in time and motion. The makers used the tourniquets in the Limburg farmland as an instrument in making the film. These turnstiles allow people to pass, but stop the cattle. The chance location of the tourniquet (nine different ones were used in the film) determine the panoramic view. By each tourniquet a complete circle was filmed in all four seasons. This approach based on a strictly formal point of departuredoes however provide an amount of material which can equally be regarded as a documentary. It provides a picture of the location in different conditions and the lengthy gaps between shooting also help reveal the changes in the landscape.Jochems and Hamelberg edited the numerous panoramas they collected into a kind of musical composition of images, in which sound also plays an important role. The iron turnstiles make noises as they are turned which were painstakingly recorded and used in the film. 'Each turnstile is different, crooked or level, stiff or fluid in rotation, and if you're lucky sounds like a complex composition in contemporary music,' according to the makers. 'There are a few melodious ones which provide a wealth of lower and upper tones, sharp and hollow sounding noises in an apparently random series to the sensitive ear.'The tourniquette itself, as the camera mount, remains out of sight.

Andras Hamelberg, Frederieke Jochems
  • 15'

  • Netherlands

IFFR 2004