At first sight, this is a conventional documentary sketching a picture of a recruiting office for the United States Marine Corps in the district Queens in New York. After some time, it turns out that the film is more meticulous and stubborn than the usual documentary and in addition takes more time to get to know its protagonists (and to present them to the viewer). The Marines who have to do the recruiting -they have to acquire a quota of applications within a fixed time -are young, inexperienced and hardly differ in age and background from their target group. This target group is made up of young men (and women) who are about to be social failures. Without schooling, without a job, but still not quite on drugs or involved in crime. The marines as a last resort. The recruiting officers regard their work on the home front as a significant contribution to the battle -and of course as a way to advance their careers within the Marines. The film follows several people (recruiting officers and recruits) for a longer period: from a first conversation to the completion of the first real training camp. In a matter-of-fact way, the film provides a revealing glimpse of the men and women who together form the American army. Cannon fodder. (GjZ)

Filmmaker
David Houts, Andrew Dunn
Premiere
World premiere
Country
USA
Year
2004
Medium
Betacam Digi PAL
Length
90’
Language
English
Producer
Hybrid Films, Daniel Elias, David Houts
Sales
Films Transit International Inc.
Cinematography
Andrew Dunn
Sound Design
David Houts
Website
http://www.hybridfilms.tv